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Juvenile Crimes in Florida

Any crime committed by a child under the age of 18 is considered a juvenile crime. While a minor can get arrested and charged for the same crime as an adult, the process and end result are different.

The purpose of trying and ultimately punishing an adult for criminal activity is to negatively reinforce the behavior. The court assumes the adult understands their actions and the full consequences that result from them.

In the eyes of the law, a juvenile is still a child (for the most part) and should be treated as such when being punished for criminal behavior. The courts and law enforcement understand that minors may not fully comprehend the consequences of their actions. While a minor will still be punished for the crime, they typically get less severe sentences then their adult counterparts. Furthermore, the aim of the court is to rehabilitate and educate the minor so they don’t become repeat offenders.

Some of the most common crimes committed by juveniles are:

  • Assault and Battery: While technically two separate crimes, typically, they are charged together. Assault is any unlawful, intentional threat or action, while battery is the intentional striking or touching of someone against their will.
  • Aggravated Assault and Battery: This is similar to assault and battery, but it becomes aggravated if there is use of a lethal weapon.
  • Burglary: This occurs when a person enters a building with the intent to take something that doesn’t belong to them. It is quite serious and is considered a felony.
  • Petit Larceny: This is theft of property worth between $100 and $300.
  • Misdemeanor Drug Violations: When a minor is caught with illegal substances or paraphernalia, they can be charged with a misdemeanor drug violation. If the drug is serious enough, they may be charged with a felony.
  • Disorderly Conduct: Public fighting, loitering, and noise complaints are usually considered acts of disorderly conduct.
  • Criminal Trespassing: This is defined as entry and/or remaining in a building or property without permission from the owner.
  • Driving Under the Influence: There is a zero-tolerance policy for anyone under the age of 21 to be driving a motor vehicle with alcohol in their system.

Contact the Law Office of Jody L. Fisher

If your child has been arrested and is facing conviction for a juvenile crime, contact the Law Office of Jody L. Fisher today. Our firm has successfully negotiated with the courts to reduce or dismiss the charges of many minors, and we are ready to do the same for your child.

Call our firm today at (352) 503-4111 or contact us onlineto schedule your consultation.

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